International Development – Written answers on 19th March.

Developing Countries: Malaria

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress she has made in implementing programmes to increase the prevention and treatment of malaria in less developed countries. [148349]

Lynne Featherstone: DFID directly supports malaria control efforts in 17 high burden malaria countries where we have bilateral programmes. DFID is funding programmes to deliver bednets and indoor residual spraying programmes and to improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment. DFID also invests in multilateral organisations such as the Global Fund to fight against AIDS, TB and Malaria and the World Health Organisation, which have programmes in all countries with a high malaria burden. In addition, DFID directly supports research programmes, evidence generation and new product development in malaria, and is active in artemisinin resistance containment efforts in South-East Asia.

UK support will help halve malaria deaths in at least 10 high burden countries by 2015, and sustain these gains into the future.

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress her Department has made in targeting support on those who most need malaria drugs; and which interventions have been proven to work in the latest period which figures are available. [148455]

Lynne Featherstone: The need for malaria drugs is particularly high in sub-Saharan Africa, where 90% of malaria deaths occur, and among the poor. In Ghana 34% of a poor family’s income can be spent on avoiding or treating malaria.

The UK Government is a strong supporter of the Affordable Medicine Facility for Malaria (AMFm). An independent evaluation of phase one of the AMFm

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conducted in 2012 confirmed overall success in generating greater accessibility of high quality malaria drugs, at lower prices, to those who need them. We recently announced UK support of up to £36 million for the transition of the AMFm from a pilot into core Global Fund programmes. This should provide quality, affordable treatment to those in need, in more countries.

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development with reference to the business plan for malaria, what progress she has made on removing the barriers that prevent people seeking medical care. [148506]

Lynne Featherstone: Barriers to accessing medical care include financial and geographical access to services and the poor quality of care at service providers. In many countries the UK Government has long taken a health systems strengthening approach to service provision.

With regard to malaria the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria (AMFm) initiative is aimed at reducing barriers in access to malaria care through ensuring affordable prices of high quality malaria treatment.

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development with reference to the business plan for malaria, what progress she has made in ensuring that health systems and services are of the highest quality. [148507]

Lynne Featherstone: The UK Government supports Universal Health Coverage, which aims to ensure that all people have access to health services that are of sufficient quality, without the risk of financial hardship. The UK Government’s support to health system strengthening contributes to the provision of higher quality and more effective services on a sustained basis.

Developing Countries: Medical Treatments

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what support her Department has provided for research and development into vaccines and treatment for HIV, tuberculosis and malaria in the last two years. [148977]

Lynne Featherstone: For the last two years for which financial records are complete, DFID provided £40 million in 2010-11 and £33 million in 2011-12 in support of research and development into vaccines and treatments for HIV, tuberculosis and malaria.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what support her Department plans to provide for research and development into vaccines and treatment for HIV, tuberculosis and malaria in the next two years. [148978]

Lynne Featherstone: DFID is currently running a competition for research funding for research and development into vaccines and treatments for HIV, tuberculosis and malaria and other diseases of poverty. The results of the competition will not be available until later in the year and therefore it is not possible to estimate the level of support at this time.